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20131202
20131210
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CNBC
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
just that, combining holidays with healthcare. this uninsured louisiana man had a complicated quintuple bypass. this woman from bend, oregon, a bit of an eye lift. >> it was just beyond my expectations. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this episode, we'll look at people who market medical procedures as business ventures, everything from anti-aging treatments to a protocol that claims to end addiction. we'll begin with doctors and pharmacists who are catering to the 78 million aging baby boomers who want to slow that aging process down or to even turn back the clock. the treatments usually include doses of the same performance-enhancing drugs that are now banned by most professional sports-- things like testosterone, dhea, and human growth hormone. as we first reported in 2006, all of this his highly controversial and possibly even illegal, but that's not stopping thousands of doctors from taking up the practice or patients from seeking them out. this is the temple of anti-aging medicine, the cenegenics medical institute of las vegas, nevada. >> let's take
CNBC
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
healthcare is among the costliest are protected by federal law. but thousands of companies and countless municipal governments and police departments refuse to hire smokers, and some require affidavits and even use lie detector tests to enforce the policy. bosses like howard weyers will not pay for what they see as other people's bad habits. >> the biggest frustration in the workplace is the cost of healthcare. medical plans weren't established to pay for unhealthy lifestyles. >> how much does it cost you? how much of the smokers that you once employed here cost you? >> i never really measured them. >> so it may not have cost you a dime? >> well, it may not, but i don't know what's gonna happen five years from now with that person who's smoking. that's what i don't want to wait for. >> this former college football coach works out five times a week and wants his employees to share his values. at weyco, howard rules. >> i've set the policy. i'm not gonna bend from the policy. >> but it strikes me as a kind of intolerant attitude to the habits, foibles, eccentricities of other people. >> ri
CNBC
Dec 1, 2013 11:00pm EST
signs day and night. >> the healthcare industry is going to be revolutionized because you will have sensors at various points of your body measuring different things, and a computer somewhere, or maybe a doctor, will be examining you all the time. >> and the whole concept demonstration is built for the diabetic audience. >> it's not that far-fetched. health monitoring was a major theme at that recent wireless convention in las vegas. >> the concept of the annual physical examination, it's almost worthless, because looking at your body at a point in time doesn't really tell doctors very much at all. but if you could measure these things all the time, you can predict heart failures, you can predict diabetes, and you can prevent all these things. >> from his hideaway overlooking the pacific in southern california, cooper contemplates a society where such familiar touchstones like money and credit cards, simple human contacts, are things of the past, replaced by wireless devices that will rule our lives. >> isn't there almost a kind of brave new world sense behind all of this being conn
CNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am EST
georgetown university. no money, no savings, no healthcare, nothing. i ended up at a place here in new jersey called thomas edison state college, the second biggest in new jersey, it's a correspondence degree. i got my whole degree when i was 30 for $10,000. my whole college degree in $10,000 in today's dollars. i'm not suggesting that georgetown university needs to serve -- let's call me a loser -- you don't have to serve me. but what can georgetown and syracuse and a lot of other great private universities do to serve more people who are underserved? >> sure. sure. >> two points and i want to come back to your experience, but in answer to your direct question. what we've done is built pipelines with schools that are providing opportunity in the fourth quartile. in the lowest socioeconomic status. the new exciting set of schools, 25 across the nation, first one established in chicago in 1996. we have 51 students at georgetown right now. we do a summer institute for rising seniors. we're doing the same with kipp schools, we have theater programs within the state itself. it's very insti
CNBC
Dec 2, 2013 6:00am EST
necessarily bend the cost curve and make sure healthcare costs don't continue to climb. >> it would be unquestionably be the cost curve if you allow the insurance companies have copayments and deductible so i can carry more of the costs. at the same time, what congress is doing has been reluctant to do anything with medicare that would assume more of the costs or for that matter military retirees. you've got plenty of evidence where on the right and on the left when it comes to health care, people are saying things that produce round of applause. not telling people the truth of what's going to have to occur if we actually want the cost of health care -- >> the times has a good piece here. i thought the headline was misleading where -- >> the back end. >> but the back end does not work. >> the front end -- >> it's insurers claim that the health website is still flawed. it is still flawed because the back end does not fit. >> they can't get the information. >> from what i can tell, everybody knows that the back end has not been addressed yet. >> but that'd be like me saying the whole
CNBC
Dec 3, 2013 9:00am EST
my healthcare professional... that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you have these, new, or worsening depression, or unusual changes in mood or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores from diabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swelling of hands, legs and feet. don't drink alcohol while taking lyrica. don't drive or use machinery until you know how lyrica affects you. those who have had a drug or alcohol problem may be more likely to misuse lyrica. ask your doctor about lyrica today. it's specific treatment for diabetic nerve pain. to hear more of terry's story, visit lyrica.com. you can fill that box and pay one flat rate. i di
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6